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20110701
20110731
STATION
KQED (PBS) 29
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be more sporadic. this does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before from a group called india mujahedin. they are an indigenous group. those are looking at it and they're pointing towards that group. >> interesting because in 2008, india blames elements within pakistan. do you think that there might be a coincidence in these attacks happening just months after the peace talks between india and pakistan started? >> it is inconceivable that india would have any role in this because india and pakistan are now engaged in a dialogue. the foreign ministers will be meeting shortly. pakistan is facing multiple threats. we have had an outbreak of sectarian violence. we know how involved they are. we have a pakistani taliban attack. we are at the point of a new low. the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable. >> what about indian intelligence gathering and security? there has been a number of cracks, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authority's confidence? >> there will be questions about an
again. three explosions rocked india's financial capital, killing at least 21 people. and on at libya's front line, and to counter attack by colonel gaddafi's forces against rebels advancing on tripoli. >> you can hear it. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also a round the globe. the last few days have brought in a credible reversal of fortune for rupert murdoch's media empire. today came another blow. public and political pressure, news corporation withdrew its bid for bskyb. it is another casualty of the hacking firestorm. now prime minister david cameron has announced details of a far- reaching inquiry into recent events. for more on how the deal went bust, here is the bbc business editor. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> rupert murdoch, the great news mogul, in the news for the wrong reasons. putting on a brave face before one of the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment for his attempt to take over bskyb. here is the explosives didn't. we believe the proposed acquisition of bskyb by news corporation would benefit both companies, but it
of the year and beyond. >> in india, the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton vowed cooperation between the two countries on intelligence sharing and counter-terrorism operations. the announcement was made in delhi and she went on to found at the obama administration will not ease pressure on neighboring pakistan. -- she went on to vow that the obama administration will not ease pressure on neighboring pakistan. >> this used to be rare. now they are routine. both countries are determined to strengthen their strategic global partnership, defense and regional security or on the agenda. the agreed to work closer together in afghanistan as the u.s. agreed to pull out its troops. hillary clinton praised the recent resumption of talks between india and pakistan. >> we think this is the most promising approach to encourage both sides to build more confidence between them and work to implement the kinds of steps that will demonstrate the improved atmosphere that is so necessary for us to deal with the underlying problem of terrorism. >> she also said that terrorism was on everyone's minds follo
the coordinated bomb blasts in india's financial capital. >> ifill: political editor david chalian takes us inside president obama's record- breaking 2012 money haul. >> woodruff: paul solman reports on an ohio company that guarantees its workers jobs even during a recession. >> a vast, century old lincoln electric in the heart of the rust belt, workers average $28 an hour and yet there hasn't been a layoff here in at least 70 years. >> ifill: and we check in on how the pentagon is repealing its "don't ask, don't tell" policy starting with the acceptance of gay recruits. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them
optimistic about india. it thinks it can sell a lot of mining equipment this because of coal mining. and it's also very bullish on latin america. >> tom: it's our mid west bureau chief tonight from chicago, diane os strks erbroork. >> you're welcome tom. >> tom: in addition to caterpillar, three more big multi-national companies reported earnings. general electric saw profits up 21% while sales picking up in china and india. earnings were better than expected and the company is sticking with its forecast for double digit growth this year. another global conglomerate, honeywell had a 40% jump in profits, earnings were better than expected thanks to its aerospace electronics business. honeywell called the global industrial outlook very good. and the golden arches see green. mcdonald's second quarter profit was up 15% as it successfully raises prices to make up for higher commodity prices. mcdonald's shot up more than 2%. the best gain in the dow industrials putting it at an all-time high today. and with that, let's get to the market focus. with all those big companies and dow components repo
.s. troops this year. the remaining 23,000 will leave by september of next year. in india, investigators in mumbai searched for clues in wednesday's triple bombing that killed 17 people and wounded 130 more. others demanded answers to how the city was attacked again, despite stepped-up security. we have a report narrated by john sparks of "independent television news." >> reporter: there was no warning. placed in the streets of mumbai the aftermath of one blast, a few hours later detectives began their investigation. a series of bombs detonated in rapid succession. this not the work of suicide bombers said the police. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, secu
and india, while coke's north american business was flat. one of the drags on the dow today was health care company johnson & johnson. shares fell more than 0.5%, dropping to a three-week low. in reaction to earnings results. while earnings were better than expected, the company said fewer elective surgeries and doctor visits have held back growth. it left its forecast unchanged. that led to selling pressure. check out this move by harley davidson today-- almost 9% higher as volume increased four- fold. talk about get your motors running here! this is harley's highest price in almost four years, after reporting strong second quarter profits. u.s. sales were up for the first time since late 2006. harley raised forecast for how many bikes it will ship, despite the c.e.o. calling consumers skittish. beyond earnings, some talk of buyouts helped interdigital shares rocket up more than 28%. look at this nice move here, bouncing around, finally jumping today. this company holds thousands of wireless communication patents used by apple, research in motion, microsoft and others. the company is consi
canada and india are heavily investing in their space program. can the u.s. afford to give up its >> i think from an industrial and military point of view, i think the u.s. has to keep investing in space because it's extremely important, so maybe not the same way we've been doing it. >> susie: scott? >> yeah. we are a great nation and we serve a space program worthy of a great nation. >> susie: we're going to leave it there. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> susie: and we've been seeking with scott hubbard and michael mandel. >> tom: here's what we're watching for tomorrow. it's another big day for quarterly reports. we'll hear from amd, at&t, microsoft and pepsi. u.s. air and united also report quarterly numbers tomorrow. airlines have been flying high this summer with full planes and some fare hikes. we'll look at whether they could be headed for turbulence this fall. >> susie: the government shutdown in minnesota is over. governor mark dayton made it official today. he signed a new budget, ending the nation's longest state government shutdown in the past decad
ambassador to india. i ew none of the that. but i had the chance charlie to thank him from the bottom of my heart. he changed my lynch. and i have a son who i a teacher. teachesnglish in high school. and i'm so proud that that's what he's doing, so proud that he is having that kind of affect on the students he's teaching. and having, making his mark as a citizen, as a human being that way. >> charlie any regrets? >> me? >> charlie: yes. >> no. >> charlie: no. >> oh, some, of course. >> charlie: no great obsession, there's no great goal, there was no great sort of untain that you didn't climb. >> the best decision i ever made was to go to washington to though a job i had here in new york, good job, to the winds and go to washington in. new kennedy administration. when he said ask not what your country can do for you but wt youcan do for your country. i took that to hea. i went down and got a job at the usia when edward meryl was thee and opened upy life beyond journalism for me. at's when i found the photographs taken after the flood and i want to read more bit. i took books o and they d
play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we have a different economic system, different experience. said you can say whatever you want but whatever light are you going to shine on kick-starting the tradition is going to help us. we might not take everything you say. but we are too caught up in our indonesian struggles. and the other thing, charlie that we have in this country. we have possibly the most extraordinary resources, literal resources on islam and muss lim societies that no other country in the world has. e lrary at chicago, harvard's major library, princeton's library has terials an literary resources in arabi, petitionian, turkish, in every language. we have experts that can tell y about details about practices of islam in indonesia to timbuktu. and but t
of flows fundamentals. markets, marts, azil, india growth terms of a underdeveloped and the from that thmarkets. have trillion of dollars worth reserves whereas the countries are in nations so standpoints the countries are in going next five opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> one of the most intresting things that week when that it the u.s. debt from a.a.a. that it ratings of american unchanged. the something you seeing in market the markets risk attacks is than some of american similar patent well. unusual. what moodies what you are rkets is a investors are acally, the mpletely fantastic west. run companies th the aren't run the about corporate government. everything els it's about political risk about everything ee. that the used to to emerging people this country but we don't political risks unedictably >> bill what is going to who hold us treasures. >> how are they going to get there money. >> well, they've got to get problem, in treasuries is that downgraded by rating standard & that the goes up. it's hard to know how much, i would suggest an actual downgrade debt woul
in the world because you've got these rising powers, china, india, brazil, but we don't -- >> but we don't -- what they antarctica late, what we don't yet know is what they stand for. what is their big idea. what are these now powers going to bring to the world. so everybody is still lookinto america for the leadership and ashomas sa america is still the tent pole but europeans and everyone, i think, are asking can where is u.s. headed it cannot gone with these levels of deficits and debt. mething has to be done but the one thing president obama has not articulated is some broad vision for the united states to compete in the world. energy is one very obvious area tha tom writes a lot about. i was recently in copenhagen, in copenhagen they are now heeding the entire city this winter, last winter by burning their own gar badge. there are dramatic changes going on. why is green technolog being lead by scandinavia, by asia. and that vision is just lacking. >> let me open that up with everybody. the idea of obama leadership, i mean as did has said is not acted boldly where he might have want
, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation, which could mean literally eight ars from now. >> right. >> rose: because the n
of china and india and the economic growth of those emerging nations. it has to do with the fact that technology s no respect for boundaries which we are discovering in the middle east right now, right. >> absolutely. >> where do you come down on that in terms of america because you're leaving america. >> yh. america h ha great natural resources, huge amount of land and that's been extremely important in its growth. but it also has respeed science and innovation. and we see great growth areas. i mean california and in the boston area in particularly and i think america recognizeds the importance of human capital. i think that's intellectual capital and the generation of ideas. but it needs more nurturing. i mean science education in the u.s. is not up to scratch. >> what does that mean not up to scratch. >> it'just not generating enough educated individuals either those that would actually go into science which is what we're mainly talking about here, but also producing an educated population who can actually coribute making decisions in democracy that are increasingly going to
of india, ford of china. but henry in order set ford up that way because he wanted t participate in the economies, not only provide people with great cars andruck but al is he be part ofñr the fabric of te economy in every part of which we operate. but he never anticipated they would operate completely independently. thereñ2hu8zÑi no syner and yet e were competing with the best anotigr reallyñr important thini found was thatñr because of our cost structure and the agreements we had we hadÑi made with usa, we uld not make kawrltzçó in the unitedtates. that's why we were focusing on usv's and trucks. if youÑi want toÑi pick it up, e weren't making cars them. we wereñr losingÑi money on alle brkn and a the models. and my first forecast thatÑi i shared in 2006 was a $17 billion loss for the year for 2006.çóñr plan andñr we needed to mov decisively. >> charlie: there's a story which has been repeated often. you're in a meeting with some of the executives who report to you and you saido em, are we doing anything wrong or mething like that. and they nobody raised their
that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by the way, they want us to manage the relationship with china in a positive constructive way. >> rose: can the chinese fear that we're... want to be too big a player in the region and looking the secretary speech in vietnam, for example? >> that's a gd questionnd one that's debated in china and i'd answer it this way. the chinese recognize-- and i've spent a lot of time with the leaders of china over the last too and a half years and that's a very interesting article published boy their state counselor and for your viewers who dot have the chinese foreign ministry on their list serve, you can rea about this in the last chapter of henry kissinger's book "on china." a fascinating discussion. >> rose: he's the most prominent person in chinese foreign policy and he was a participant in the dialogues. >> exactly. so there's a debate in china a
with all these militant groups mostly because they want us to use them as proxies against india which is their long-term adversary but now it has come back to haunt them and many of these same militant islamic groups that they sort of thought they could manage or handle have gotten way out of control and not only moving against afghanistan but in many cases turning against the pakistani state itself. >> you spent a lot of time in the country reporting from there, pam constable. the feeling many ode pakistanies have for the taliban. we see all these terrible things the taliban does. and yet you say many pakistanies regard it as a force for good. >> yes. i would say that, you know, i don't want to oversimplify by saying that the pakistanies are in love with the taliban. it's not true. most pakistanies have never met a member of the taliban and most pakistanis would sit here and say they don't believe in chopping off people's heads or any of the terrible things they do. but on the other hand, there's a great surge in what i call a very emotional kind of attachment to the religion of isla
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)